Browsing by an invasive herbivore promotes development of plant and soil communities during primary succession

11-year study of experimental exclusion of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) from early primary successions on landslides in montane western South Island, New Zealand. The data support: Bellingham PJ, Kardol P, Bonner KI, Buxton RP, Morse CW, Wardle DA 2016 Browsing by an invasive herbivore promotes development of plant and soil communities during primary succession. Journal of Ecology 104, in press, doi: 10.1111/1365-2745.12624

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Additional Info

Field Value
Authors Bellingham, Peter J.
Kardol, P.
Bonner, Karen I.
Buxton, Rowan P.
Morse, Chris W
Wardle, David A.
Maintainer Peter Bellingham
Last Updated October 15, 2018, 12:09 (NZDT)
Created December 22, 2015, 14:07 (NZDT)
Preferred citation Bellingham, P.J., Kardol, P., Bonner, K.I., Buxton, R.P., Morse, C.W, Wardle, D.A. (2016). Indirect effects of browsing by an invasive herbivore drive plant and soil communities during primary succession [Data]. doi:10.7931/J2MK69TZ
zDataup Dataset deposited via DataUp at 20151222-1407
Publisher Landcare Research NZ Ltd
Publication Year 2016
DOI https://doi.org/10.7931/J2MK69TZ